What is a backtick key?

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[for anyone looking to find the "backtick" key on a regular US style keyboard]

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no reply required - just informational

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Some people might also find it easier to highlight the block of text and click the "Preformatted text" button on the toolbar (or press Ctrl+E), which puts the backticks in for you.

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This is pretty much a moot point if you're not using a US-ANSI keyboard :smiley:

On my ISO Italian keyboard the Alt Gr combination depends on the OS. :smiley:

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Ieuw, localised keyboards :face_vomiting:

In The Netherlands it's usually just US-International. There does exist a Dutch layout but WHY would anyone use that? For contemporary use it doesn't really offer anything beneficial.

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Also see American Standard Code for Information Interchange for encoding details.

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That sounds unusual. We actually have some letters we need that are difficult to type on a us keyboard: àèéìòù (and their capitalized versions).

Also, I thought most of Europe used ISO keyboards (double height return key, one additional key left of Z) instead of ANSI (single height return key, etc)

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Personally, I use a form of dead keys for that. No need to contaminate my keyboard with that.

Also, Dutch doesn't have many use for those pesky diacritics: Dutch is a normal, modern language :stuck_out_tongue: Sort of :rofl:

The (antiquated) Dutch layout does have a key left of the Z, but that's highly unusual nowadays. And the return key can be double height, but usually just single height.

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And hold the ALT key and type the number...
Now that's kicking it old school!

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We could all just type in UTF8 hexcodes, for universal-compatibility purposes, of course.

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I do too. I use both ISO italian keyboards and ANSI US keyboards. It starts a bit confusing but one gets used to it.

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A keyboard with just "0" and "1" and few other chars like "ENTER"
Binary Keyboard FTW!

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