Trying To Get My Hosting Provider To Install They Issued A CSR But Not Sure What To Do Next


#1

Please fill out the fields below so we can help you better. Note: you must provide your domain name to get help. Domain names for issued certificates are all made public in Certificate Transparency logs (e.g. https://crt.sh/?q=example.com), so withholding your domain name here does not increase secrecy, but only makes it harder for us to provide help.

My domain is: symbells.com

I ran this command: I didn’t

It produced this output: Nothing

My web server is (include version):Windows IIS 7.0

The operating system my web server runs on is (include version): Not sure

My hosting provider, if applicable, is: 3d cart

I can login to a root shell on my machine (yes or no, or I don’t know):

I’m using a control panel to manage my site (no, or provide the name and version of the control panel):


#2

Hi,

When you have a csr, you can go ahead and purchase / request to certificates.

In your case, (since it’s third party hosting and e-commerce) its better to use a paid certificate (since it has a long duration of 1yr+ than 3 months) to avoid renew issues.

However, you are welcome to use Let’s Encrypt tls certificate. You can go to sslforfree.com or zerossl.com and use web-based interface to request.

Thank you

P.S. for paid certificates, I personally suggest ssls.com or Namecheap.com (same company behind the scene)


#3

Hi @stevenzhu,

I don’t see anything inappropriate about using Let’s Encrypt certificates for e-commerce. Lots of e-commerce sites already do use them. While using a paid certificate may help show that one has money to spend on infrastructure (which might be a useful signal to some customers), and using an EV certificate could help motivated customers confirm the seller’s legal identity (which a few customers might appreciate), the quality of the encryption and authentication will be the same, and Let’s Encrypt certificates can be used in PCI-compliant applications, for instance.

I agree that if your hosting provider doesn’t directly support Let’s Encrypt in an automated way, it might be more convenient to obtain a longer-lasting certificate than Let’s Encrypt offers, in order to avoid the inconvenience of forgetting to renew.


#4

True…

Apologize for the mistake.


#5

Also, that hosting provider seems to charge for installation. It would be worthwhile to find out if that charge is once-off or per-renewal; in the latter case it’s very likely that a cheap but long-lived commercial cert would work out to be better value (since Let’s Encrypt certs need to be renewed at least every 90 days).


#6

Thank you everyone for the replies and the suggestions!!! you are absolutely correct I had to pay my hosting provider for installation, not sure if it was a one time charge or ongoing, you gave me a great question to ask. @stevenzhu thanks for the links the paid ones you referred are way more affordable than the ones my hosting provider was referring me to. @schoen you also brought up some valid points that I will take into consideration as I explore all my options!


#7

We also have a forum thread about hosting providers who already support Let’s Encrypt

—usually at no additional charge. However, I realize that isn’t the only factor in people’s decision about which web host to use!