Tel Let’s encrypt do no test certboot version

I run Let's Encrypt with this command:

./letsencrypt-auto-source/letsencrypt-auto certonly --manual \
  --manual-public-ip-logging-ok \
  --email john@example.com \
  --agree-tos \
  --domain example.com \
  --domain www.example.com \
  --rsa-key-size 2048

I get the following error message:

Skipping bootstrap because certbot-auto is deprecated on this system.
./letsencrypt-auto-source/letsencrypt-auto has insecure permissions!
To learn how to fix them, visit https://community.letsencrypt.org/t/certbot-auto-deployment-best-practices/91979/
Your system is not supported by certbot-auto anymore.
Certbot cannot be installed.
Please visit https://certbot.eff.org/ to check for other alternatives.

So, how to tell Le's Encrypt to no be as perfectionist as he is? Am just in a test project and no need all this suspicious behaviour. Also, there is no need to do all the annoying stuff asked.

So, basically, how to telle Let’s Encrypt “Just let it go. I know what I am doing”?

Why are you using that?

It was deprecated years ago.

There are alternatives. Like using certbot and installing it the proper way, or using stuff like acme.sh or dehydrated.

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This is not output from "Let's Encrypt", but from the ACME client Certbot. The name of the ACME client was "letsencrypt" back in the early days of Let's Encrypt, but was renamed fairly quickly to "Certbot".

The "certbot-auto" (or in your case with the legacy name "letsencrypt-auto") script is a wrapper script around the actual client Certbot and, as @9peppe already said, has been deprecated for some time now.

You should not use the letsencrypt-auto script at all any longer.

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