Certificate for multiple websites

I have a shared GoDaddy account with several websites. Is it possible to have one certificate cover all, or do I need separate certificates for each website?

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you can pack multiple name into a certificate. but shared GoDaddy is not support automated installation of certificate.

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Sounds like a question for GD.
The LE restriction is 100 names maximum and 1 name minimum in the SAN field of the certificate.

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Hello :slightly_smiling_face:

I'm assuming you're using GoDaddy cPanel shared hosting. You want a separate certificate for each apex (primary) domain name that covers its alias subdomain names. For example.com, I recommend a certificate covering example.com, www.example.com, and mail.example.com. I authored the CertSage ACME client specifically to help GoDaddy shared hosting users easily acquire Let's Encrypt certificates. With cPanel, your primary domain name's webroot directory is usually public_html and your secondary domain names' webroot directories are under public_html like public_html/whatever.com. You would put a copy of certsage.php in public_html and in each of your secondary domain names' webroot directories with those secondary certsage.php copies having line 18 modified from this:

public $dataDirectory = "../CertSage";

to this:

public $dataDirectory = "../../CertSage";
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GoDaddy does support uapi installation of certificates, which is how CertSage will perform automated installation in the near future. :slightly_smiling_face:

https://documentation.cpanel.net/plugins/servlet/mobile?contentId=8390396#content/view/8390396

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Thank you for the clear instructions. I’ll give it a try.

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To make sure I understand correctly...should I use the same certsage.php in public_html and in the secondary domain's webroot directories but edited as you show for the secondary domains? Or do I need separate certsage.php files for each domain?

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I think I may be misunderstanding the question... but here goes.
Use the same exact file.
But in the other subdirectories you will have to edit those files as instructed.
So, they are the same; But also not the same.

If the domains are all being served from the same single location, then one file will serve them all.
If the domains are being served from multiple (separate) locations, then you will need one file in each folder above each of those locations [which could all be the same one single common location (or not) - you need to review your "layout" to be sure where the files are needed].

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@rg305 has exactly the right idea. If you can access certsage.php from your browser from a particular domain name, you have most likely found the webroot directory for that domain name. The reason for modifying the dataDirectory variable is to ensure that your account keys and certificates end up in one directory that is not accessible from the public internet.

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So I would include all three domains in the file like this:
websiteone.org
www.websiteone.org
websitetwo.org
www.websitetwo.org
websitethree.org
www.websitethree.org

Correct?

You would put a copy of certsage.php into the webroot directories of:

websiteone.org
websitetwo.org
websitethree.org

then acquire and install three certificates, one at a time, where each certificate covers a website.org and www.website.org.

The three webroot directories would be something like:

public_html
public_html/websitetwo.org
public_html/websitethree.org

Keep in mind that CertSage is entirely operated from the webpage presented to you when you visit http://website.org/certsage.php.

The full instructions can be found here:

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Please review the current certs to ensure their replacements are covering all the current names therein.
Sometimes names like "blog" or "mail" are also included.

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Exactly. For example.com, I typically include example.com, www.example.com, and mail.example.com on one certificate.

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